Dating gibson poti codes

dating gibson poti codes

How many digits are in a Gibson pot code?

The manufacturers code has six (1950s) or seven digits, starting with 137 (CTS) or 134 (Centralab), and ending in format y/ww or yy/ww [where y is the year, and w is the week of the year]. For more information on Gibson pot codes (and others), see Reading Pot Codes

What are pot codes and how do you date a guitar?

If youve been reading articles about dating a vintage guitar, you may well have come across mention of pot codes, and the concept of using pot codes to date your guitar. The pots, or potentiometers to give their full name, are the variable resistors that control volume and tone.

How do you date a Gibson Guitar by serial number?

DATING GIBSON GUITARS AND MANDOLINS BY REFERENCE OF SERIAL NUMBERS 1 1935-1937: Letter between the batch number and the order number. e.g. 0123 A5 2 1938-1941: Two or three letters before batch number. The first letter is the year. ... 3 Exceptions: Some high-end models and lap steels from 1939-1940

How do I find a potentiometer for a Gibson Guitar?

You can look up Gibson potentiometers by their part number in the Gibson pot index on this site. There are very many electronic companies worldwide producing potentiometers, but most American vintage guitars of the 20th Century used pots by just a few manufacturers.

What do the numbers on a parts number on a pot mean?

Pots usually have several identification numbers. One is the manufacturers id code with date, and another is the Gibson part number. The manufacturers code has six (1950s) or seven digits, starting with 137 (CTS) or 134 (Centralab), and ending in format y/ww or yy/ww [where y is the year, and w is the week of the year].

How to read guitar pot codes?

Reading pot codes 1 Part numbers. Many pots do not have part numbers, but the larger guitar manufacturers did list pots by part number in their spare parts manuals. 2 Manufacturers codes. ... 3 Production dates. ... 4 Resistance values and taper. ...

What is the Gibson pot database?

This website uses cookies to personalise content and adverts, to provide social media features, and to analyse traffic. Learn more This Gibson pot database contains part numbers with respective models for all Gibsons from the early 1960s until the early 1980s as described in the various replacement parts lists distributed by Gibson.

Are all Gibson pots the same?

As always with Gibson, there a probably many vintage guitars that dont conform to the catalog descriptions, which are often incomplete and may even contain errors. Gibson pots are NOT all the same.

Are all Gibson potentiometers the same?

As always with Gibson, there a probably many vintage guitars that dont conform to the catalog descriptions, which are often incomplete and may even contain errors. Gibson pots are NOT all the same. Most 60s-70s Gibson potentiometers were made by CTS (Chicago Telephone Company), although other manufacturers did also supply pots to Gibson.

What are the different types of guitar potentiometers?

Types of Guitar Potentiometers At a top level there are mini-pots and full-size pots. Potentiometer designs are short-shaft pots, long-shaft pots, and push-pull pots. Potentiometer designs also have split-shaft design, solid-shaft design.

What is a potentiometer cap on a guitar?

Pots and caps are part of the electrical system in electric guitars and bass guitars. They are located in hollow cavities in your instrument’s body, underneath control knobs. Your control knobs are installed on the shaft of the potentiometer thereby enabling you to make changes to tone and volume.

Who made potentiometers in the 60s and 70s?

Most 60s-70s Gibson potentiometers were made by CTS (Chicago Telephone Company), although other manufacturers did also supply pots to Gibson. Pots usually have several identification numbers. One is the manufacturers id code with date, and another is the Gibson part number.

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